Reliance Jio tariff plans expected to start at Rs 50 for 10GB 4G data and 500 minutes of voice calls

Reliance revolutionised the Indian telecom sector back in 2003, and it seems moving towards repeating the feat. Mukesh Ambani-owned Reliance Jio has been in the news ever since it became the only operator to hold pan-India 4G license. The company is also cashing in on the buzz quite aggressively, as even before the commercial rollout, consumers have the ability to test out its services free of charge under the ‘Jio preview offer’.

Reliance Jio

The preview offer is certainly enticing as it offers free calls and 4G data, but it’s valid for a period of 90 days only. If you are wondering about Jio’s tariffs once the service  launches commercially, then we might have good news for you.

Reliance Jio tariffs - 91mobiles 01

As per a reliable source who also managed to take a screengrab of the tariffs, the recharge plans for 30 days would start at as low as Rs 50, which would include 10GB 4G data, 100 SMSes and 500 minutes of voice calls. To offer an entire ecosystem to its users, Jio also has a variety of apps offering premium content, such as JioBeats for music, JioMags for magazines, and JioPlay for TV shows among others, and the base plan would let users use two of these apps. For Rs 100, subscribers would get the double the benefits – 20GB 4G data, 200 SMSes, and 1,000 minutes of voice calls, along with the ability to access three Jio apps. For 40GB data, 400 SMSes, 1,500 minutes of calls, and access to five apps, one would need to pay Rs 200. Moving up, Rs 400 will get you a whopping 60GB 4G data, 500 SMSes, 2,500 minutes worth of voice calls and access to seven premium apps from Jio for a period of 30 days.

With Jio firing on all cylinders to make the preview offer available for all compatible mobile devices, the commercial launch seems imminent. Do note that since the official announcement on the tariffs hasn’t been made yet, the details we have provided could change before the actual commercial release. However, if the aforementioned tariffs are true, then there’s little doubt that Reliance Jio would revolutionise the telecom industry. For reference, 1GB of 4G data from other operators costs roughly Rs 250 currently, which means that Jio would be undercutting all the incumbents, inevitably leading to price wars.

Clever car racking and intelligent software double number of cars in shipping containers

Shipping cars could be safer and more efficient than ever before, thanks to innovative solutions developed by WMG at the University of Warwick for Trans-Rak International (TRI).

Clever car racking & intelligent software double number of cars in shipping containers

Working with Warwickshire-based manufacturer Trans-Rak International, Piero Filippin, Innovation Manager at WMG, has created software that automates the task of finding the optimal placement of cars in a shipping container – allowing for any combination of make or model – and can double the vehicle capacity of shipping containers.

The software operates a car racking system produced by TRI, and the combined technologies could lead to massive savings for the global automotive industry, enabling more cars to fit into fewer containers, as they are transported across the world.

Currently, an average of two cars can be stored in each container. That capacity would be doubled to four cars using this revolutionary system.

The software, developed by Piero Filippin, generates recommendations on any number of cars, of different makes and models, to be stored in the most efficient possible combination and position.

Users select the number of cars, as well as which makes/models, they wish to transport. A numerical process simulates hundreds of thousands of different loading scenarios, and generates a report of the most efficient combination of cars in each container, as well as their exact positioning.

Clever car racking & intelligent software double number of cars in shipping containers

The racking hardware, developed at TRI, comprises of removable, metal components that come together to form a variable-dimension frame, with which cars can be lifted up inside a container, allowing other cars to be positioned efficiently underneath the lifted cars.

Piero Filippin, explained the impact of this new software:

“The solution developed for TRI has totally transformed the manual-based processes previously used for establishing the optimal placement of a set of cars. The new software-inspired system allows specific vehicles to be selected from a comprehensive list, meaning a quicker view can be gained in relation to vehicle configuration. This has helped save considerable time, resource and money.”

“The new system is a great example of how digital technologies can provide added value to manufacturing, and will help those involved in vehicle transportation to reduce costs and improve customer service,” continued Filippin.

Paul Donaldson, Managing Director of Trans-Rak International, commented “the software developed by Piero Filippin will enable users to deploy our equipment more efficiently, futher reducing the number of containers that need to be moved for a given number of vehicles.”

WhatsApp is going to share your phone number with Facebook

Global messaging service WhatsApp says it will start sharing the phone numbers of its users with Facebook, its parent company. That means WhatsApp users could soon start seeing more targeted ads and Facebook friend suggestions on Facebook based on WhatsApp information—although not on the messaging service itself.

WhatsApp is going to share your phone number with Facebook

The move is a subtle but significant shift for WhatsApp, used by more than 1 billion people around the world. When it was acquired by Facebook for an eye-popping $21.8 billion two years ago, executives promised privacy would be safeguarded.

“This is a strong-arm tactic on the part of Facebook,” said Jeff Chester, executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy in Washington, D.C. “They continue on a campaign on to run roughshod on our privacy rights.”

WhatsApp is giving users a limited time to opt out of sharing their information with Facebook, although they must take the extra step of unchecking a box to do so. It also says Facebook won’t post phone numbers online or give them out to anyone.

But the giant social network has been looking for ways to make money from WhatsApp since it bought the service two years ago. At the same time, Facebook has pledged not to interfere with a longstanding promise by WhatsApp’s co-founders to respect users’ privacy and keep ads off its messaging platform.

WhatsApp on Thursday offered a glimpse of its plans for turning on the money spigot, releasing new documents that describe the company’s privacy policy and the terms of service that users must agree to follow. The documents are the first revision of those policies since 2012, before Facebook acquired WhatsApp.

One change follows through on previous hints by WhatsApp executives, who have said they’re exploring ways for businesses to communicate with customers on WhatsApp. That could include using WhatsApp to provide receipts, confirm a reservation or update the status of a delivery.

Companies could also send marketing offers or messages about sales to individual customers, according to the new documents, which note that users will be able to control or block such messages. WhatsApp says it will continue to bar traditional display ads from its service.

“We do not want you to have a spammy experience,” the company tells users in a summary of the new policies.

Another change is potentially more controversial: WhatsApp says it will begin “coordinating” accounts with Facebook by sharing WhatsApp users’ mobile phone numbers and device information, such as the type of operating system and other smartphone characteristics. The company says Facebook will employ the phone number internally to better identify WhatsApp users on Facebook, so it can make friend suggestions or show targeted advertising.

The ads would come through a Facebook program called “Custom Audiences,” which lets a business upload lists of customers and phone numbers or other contact information the business has collected from warranty cards or other sources. Facebook matches the list to users with the same information and shows them ads. Facebook says it doesn’t give out users’ information to advertisers.

WhatsApp phone numbers are valuable to Facebook. While the social network already has many phone numbers, it doesn’t require users to provide them, and doesn’t always have the most current number for everyone on Facebook. But anyone on WhatsApp must provide a current phone number because that’s how WhatsApp knows where to deliver messages.

The coordination of accounts may draw fire from privacy advocates. WhatsApp has long promised not to employ user data for advertising. Its acquisition by Facebook two years ago sparked complaints from activists who worried the new owner would start mining WhatsApp accounts. Though both companies pledged WhatsApp would operate separately from its parent, the Federal Trade Commission warned them publicly, in a 2014 letter, against changing how they employ WhatsApp user data without users’ consent.

WhatsApp says current users have up to 30 days to accept the new policy terms or stop using the service. Once they accept, they have 30 more days to opt out of sharing with Facebook.

Privacy groups have praised WhatsApp for building powerful encryption into its services, making it impossible for the company or anyone else to read users’ messages. WhatsApp promises that encryption will remain, so neither WhatsApp nor Facebook would be able to use message content for advertising purposes.

But privacy activists also criticized the 30-day window to opt out.

“Very few people opt out, it should be an informed opt in,” Chester said. “No data should be used unless people are informed honestly about how it’s going to be used.”